Classics - Majors/Minors

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The Classics Major

ThThe Classics Major The Classical Civilization major offers the opportunity to study two incredible languages: Ancient Greek and Latin. It also includes many disciplines: language, literature, history, philosophy, art, archeology, religion, and mythology. The major enables the students to approach the ancient world from a broad interdisciplinary standpoint and gain an appreciation for the many cultures of  Statue of Cicero Mediterranean antiquity.   Classics Program Educational Objectives and Assessments A student graduating from UC Davis with a major in Classical Civilization will be able to:  Demonstrate broad familiarity with the culture, literature, history, and material remains of Greco-Roman antiquity. Assessment: Final exams and writing assignments from a representative sample of Classics (CLA) courses will be reviewed every three years for accuracy, appropriateness, and argumentation.  Demonstrate reading-level proficiency in at least one ancient language (Greek or Latin). Assessment: Final exams and writing assignments from a representative sample of upper division Greek and Latin courses (and Hebrew courses, when offered) will be reviewed every three years for proficiency in vocabulary, syntax, translation, and interpretation.  Demonstrate critical analysis of primary and secondary sources through rational and evidence-based written argumentation. Assessment: Essays and research papers from a representative sample of upper division courses (especially the Senior Seminar) will be reviewed every three years for research competence, interpretive sophistication, and sensitivity to the Classical context.  The Tracks The major has two tracks: The Classical and Mediterranean Civilization track, which most students choose, requires two years of study of one ancient language, Greek, Latin, or Hebrew. Students complete the major requirements by selecting about ten courses from a broad range of offerings in different aspects of ancient Mediterranean civilization. Students who choose the second track, Classical Lange Classical Civilization major offers the opportunity to study two incredible languages: Ancient Greek and Latin. It also includes many disciplines: language, literature, history, philosophy, art, archeology, religion, and mythology. The major enables the students to approach the ancient world from a broad interdisciplinary standpoint and gain an appreciation for the many cultures of Mediterranean antiquity.

Classics Program Educational Objectives and Assessments

A student graduating from UC Davis with a major in Classical Civilization will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate broad familiarity with the culture, literature, history, and material remains of Greco-Roman antiquity.

    Assessment: Final exams and writing assignments from a representative sample of Classics (CLA) courses will be reviewed every three years for accuracy, appropriateness, and argumentation.

  2. Demonstrate reading-level proficiency in at least one ancient language (Greek or Latin).

    Assessment: Final exams and writing assignments from a representative sample of upper division Greek and Latin courses (and Hebrew courses, when offered) will be reviewed every three years for proficiency in vocabulary, syntax, translation, and interpretation.

  3. Demonstrate critical analysis of primary and secondary sources through rational and evidence-based written argumentation.

    Assessment: Essays and research papers from a representative sample of upper division courses (especially the Senior Seminar) will be reviewed every three years for research competence, interpretive sophistication, and sensitivity to the Classical context.

 

The Tracks

The major has two tracks: The Classical and Mediterranean Civilization track, which most students choose, requires two years of study of one ancient language, Greek, Latin, or Hebrew. Students complete the major requirements by selecting about ten courses from a broad range of offerings in different aspects of ancient Mediterranean civilization. Students who choose the second track, Classical Languages and Literature, study two ancient languages, but take fewer ancient civilization courses. Most graduate programs in Classics look for incoming students who have already completed three years of both Latin and Greek or three years of one and two years of the other. Reading knowledge of German and/or French is definitely a plus. Students interested in graduate study in Classics need to inform a Classics adviser of this early in their undergraduate careers.

For further information on the Classics major, see the Major Requirements below and contact one of the faculty advisers.

Career Opportunities

The major in Classical Civilization is a liberal arts degree and is therefore excellent preparation for professional schools. Recent graduates in Classics have been successful in gaining admission to distinguished schools of law, medicine, library science, and graduate study in many liberal arts and social science disciplines. Other recent graduates have embarked on promising careers in journalism, television, publishing, museum work, and teaching.

Major Requirements

Track 1: Classical and Mediterranean Civilization

Units

Lower division courses

26-27

3 language courses

  • Latin or Greek 1, 2 and 3

15

 

2 introductory courses

  • two courses from CLA 1, 2, 3 or 4

8

 

1 cultural course

  • AHI 1A (Art History)
  • CLA 1 - 51
  • COM 1 (Comparative Literature)
  • PHI 21 (Philosophy)
  • RST 21 or 40 (Religious Studies)

3-4

 

 

 

Upper division courses

40

3 language courses (LAT 100 - 135, GRK 100 - 131)

12

CLA 190 (Senior Seminar)

4

3 upper-division courses CLA 101 - 199, or GRK or LAT 100 - 199

12

3 additional upper-division courses from CLA 101 - 199, or GRK or LAT 100 - 199

  or

  • HIS 102A, 111A, 111B, 111C
  • PHI 143, 160, 161, 162
  • RST 102, 125, 141A, 141B, 141C
  • POL 118A (Political Science)
  • CLA 150
  • CLA 171, 172A, 172B, 173, 174, 175

12

 

 




 

Total

66-67

 

 

Track 2: Classical Languages and Literatures

Units

Lower division courses

34
6 language courses
  • Latin and Greek 1, 2 and 3

30

 

1 introductory course

  • CLA 1, 2, 3 or 4

4

 

Upper division courses

36

6 language courses

  • at least two courses in each language (LAT 100 - 135, GRK 100 - 131)

24

 

CLA 190 (Senior Seminar)

4

2 additional upper-division courses to be selected from CLA 101 - 199, GRK or LAT 100 - 199 or from the following courses in other departments:

  • HIS 102A, 111A, 111B, 111C
  • PHI 143, 160, 161, 162
  • RST 102, 125, 141A, 141B, 141C
  • POL 118A
  • CLA 171, 172A, 172B, 173, 174, 175

8

 

 

 

Total

70

Minor Programs

The department offers minors in Classical Civilization, Greek, and Latin for those wishing to follow a shorter but formally recognized program of study in classics.

 

Minor Requirements

 

 

Units

 

 
Classical Civilization 20
Classics 1, 2, 3 or 4 4
One upper division course in Latin or Greek 4
Two additional upper division courses in Classics, Latin or Greek 8
One additional upper division course selected from groups (a) or (b) in the Classical Civilization major 4
   
Greek 20
Classics 1 or 2 4
Three upper division courses in Greek 12
One additional upper division course in Classics, Latin or Greek 4
   
Latin 20
Classics 3 or 4 4
Three upper division courses in Latin 12
One additional upper division course in Classics, Latin or Greek 4